EU Fragmentation – Ameritas UK News http://www.ameritas.co.uk/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 02:40:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://www.ameritas.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2022/02/icon.png EU Fragmentation – Ameritas UK News http://www.ameritas.co.uk/ 32 32 8.6 million Europeans used connected care solutions in 2021, according to Berg Insight https://www.ameritas.co.uk/8-6-million-europeans-used-connected-care-solutions-in-2021-according-to-berg-insight/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 01:34:24 +0000 https://www.ameritas.co.uk/8-6-million-europeans-used-connected-care-solutions-in-2021-according-to-berg-insight/ Berg Insight found in its latest research that around 8.6 million people in Europe were using connected care solutions at the end of 2021. The figure refers to users of traditional telecare, next generation telecare and telehealth solutions in EU27+3 countries. Through 2027, Berg Insight predicts that the number of connected care users will grow […]]]>

Berg Insight found in its latest research that around 8.6 million people in Europe were using connected care solutions at the end of 2021.

The figure refers to users of traditional telecare, next generation telecare and telehealth solutions in EU27+3 countries. Through 2027, Berg Insight predicts that the number of connected care users will grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 12.1% to reach 17.1 million. Traditional telecare is currently the largest and most mature of the three market segments, but the next-generation telecare and telehealth market segments are expected to witness a higher growth rate over the next few years. Berg Insight expects next-generation telecare to overtake traditional telecare solutions to become the largest segment with 7.7 million users expected in 2027. Traditional telecare will follow with 7.5 million users and the telehealth segment will have approximately 5.7 million users by the end of the forecast period.

The traditional market for remote assistance equipment in Europe is strongly consolidated. The two major players, Tunstall and Legrand, hold leading positions in almost all markets, even though they face competition from local players such as Careium, TeleAlarm or Chubb. The new-generation remote assistance market, on the other hand, is more fragmented. In addition to major providers of telecare equipment, companies active in the next generation market include specialist providers such as Essence Group, Everon, Vitalbase and Vivago in activity monitoring; Navigil, Libify, Oysta Technology, SmartLife Care and Smartwatcher in mobile remote assistance; and Evondos, Vitavanti, AceAge and iZafe Group in medication adherence monitoring.

The telehealth market is also a fragmented market that is rapidly changing and includes both start-ups and well-established solution providers such as Huma, Luscii, Dignio, Comarch, eDevice and SHL Telemedicine.

The European connected care industry is facing major changes that will reshape the competitive environment for solution providers and service providers over the next few years. One of the main developments is the ongoing digitization of telephone networks in Europe. Large-scale replacements of telecare equipment will be required because analog devices do not work reliably on digitized networks. At the same time, digitalization enables new types of solutions that can take care delivery to the next level. This includes next-generation telecare systems with new features as well as integrated solutions that enable combined delivery of telecare and telehealth services.are.

Samuel Andersson, IoT analyst at Berg Insight
Healthcare providers will begin to offer more and more proactive and predictive services, continuously analyzing user data and acting on anomalies. These solutions rely not only on data from remote care devices, but also from other sources such as smart home sensors, health records and connected medical devices. Another trend worth noting is the effect the Covid-19 pandemic has had on the adoption of telehealth and patient monitoring solutions. As lockdowns and quarantines were imposed around the world, healthcare providers were motivated to adopt remote patient monitoring and telehealth solutions. This helped overcome some of the institutional hesitation and conservatism that had previously been major barriers to adopting these solutions.

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Rethinking Supply Chains: A Look at the Challenges Businesses Face https://www.ameritas.co.uk/rethinking-supply-chains-a-look-at-the-challenges-businesses-face/ Mon, 30 May 2022 16:07:11 +0000 https://www.ameritas.co.uk/rethinking-supply-chains-a-look-at-the-challenges-businesses-face/ By KT Arasu, CME Group IN ONE LOOK Plans to relocate manufacturing operations to a second or third country could prove costly and complex in the face of pandemic-era realities Relocating operations must consider a variety of challenges ranging from infrastructure to the availability of skilled labor and rising wages in emerging markets The nature […]]]>

By KT Arasu, CME Group

IN ONE LOOK

  • Plans to relocate manufacturing operations to a second or third country could prove costly and complex in the face of pandemic-era realities
  • Relocating operations must consider a variety of challenges ranging from infrastructure to the availability of skilled labor and rising wages in emerging markets

The nature of globalization is changing. Supply chains are challenged – by tariffs, the pandemic and Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. The recommended strategy is resilience through diversification. The logistics are incredibly complex.

We will look at some of the main factors driving this change.

Tariffs, Russia and Ukraine

Let’s start with the tariffs introduced by the United States in 2018 that led businesses and consumers to pay more for products imported from countries where the tariffs were applied. What started as a trickle with tariffs on $8.5 billion on solar panel imports and $1.8 billion on washing machines from China snowballed into tariffs on $350 billion of Chinese imports. Customs duties were then imposed on steel and aluminum imports mainly from Canada, EU, Mexico and South Korea.

What we have learned from the tariffs imposed by the various countries – the United States, China, the European Union, Canada, Japan, Mexico and others – is that such measures, once introduced, can remain in place even when the changing political climate. For example, the Biden administration has yet to remove all tariffs that went into effect during the Trump years, although some of the tariffs are being removed following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine to help reduce inflationary pressures.

Russia is a major exporter of oil and food products like wheat. The US embargo on imports of Russian oil helped push futures prices above $100 a barrel and gasoline prices at the pump above $4 a gallon. The EU, which gets 26% of its oil and 40% of its natural gas from Russia, is considering banning imports of Russian oil. The war also increased shipping costs which were falling after the pandemic’s big peak when demand for manufactured goods increased.

Shipping costs are higher but are well below pandemic highs

The lessons of the pandemic

The pandemic has taught us that different approaches to managing COVID-19 have led to very different challenges for supply chains, depending on location. Specifically, there are big differences between China’s Zero-Covid policy and the less stringent approaches taken in the United States and Europe.

Millions of people in China are stuck or have their movements restricted while hundreds of businesses have halted operations as the government tries to contain a new wave of the pandemic. The restrictions come at a time when China’s economic growth has slowed since the last quarter of 2021. In contrast, in the United States, the mask mandate while traveling on public transport has been overturned by a US court and attendance at open events is increasing. as the spring weather encourages people to go out more – although attendance at public places is still far from pre-pandemic levels.

Strategy is easier than logistics

From a strategic perspective, companies around the world are rethinking their supply chains. Yet, from a logistics perspective, companies are quickly realizing that changing supply chains can be difficult. Two important things companies consider when offshoring are maintaining or improving market share and effectively managing operational costs while trying to improve supply chain resilience.

Some companies may be confident that they can pass the additional costs on to their customers, but others may be concerned that if a major competitor sticks with its old low-cost model, it could take market share at a lower cost. In other words, changing supply chains involves some game theory in terms of what competitors might be doing.

The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) said in a report that greenfield investment in emerging markets and developing economies in 2021 was 43% below 2019 levels. Greenfield is a form of investment foreign direct where a parent company builds its operations from scratch in another country. The decline in this type of investment reflects the difficulty of moving supply chains.

Challenges of relocation operations

Let’s look at some of the cost and complexity considerations involved in moving a production center from one country to another or setting up a parallel manufacturing center in a second or third country.

Input power: When moving to another country to manufacture a product, a company must ensure that the country to which it is relocating has the raw materials necessary to manufacture its product. For example, if you make furniture, you will need to choose a country that has the appropriate type of materials to build your furniture. The raw material usually needs to be close to your factory location and you need to ensure that there are suitable modes of transportation to get the raw materials to the factory. There must also be relatively inexpensive labor to ensure your competitiveness.

Output delivery: How do you deliver the finished product to your customers? The company needs access to suitable roads, railways and ports from the new manufacturing site to deliver products to customers in other countries. Shipping costs from the point of manufacture to destination markets could also play an important role in establishing new operations in a second or third country.

Reliance on highly specific, single-source inputs: Some key inputs for some manufactured goods are scarce or produced in only a few places. For example, the Republic of Congo is the world’s largest producer of cobalt. Manufacturing processes dependent on highly specific inputs from relatively few sources will struggle to protect themselves.

The cost of inputs increases: Input costs (output prices?) are currently rising faster than the rate of consumer price inflation. This higher cost factor comes at a time when one may wish to reduce manufacturing costs. The U.S. producer price index for all final goods and services is (April 2022) 11% higher than a year ago, while the goods component of the consumer price index production is at a higher level of 16%.

Skilled labor: Relocation operations depend to a large extent on the availability of skilled labor or a pool of workers who can be easily trained in skilled operations. The availability of labor in China has been one of its advantages, but this position is contested by emerging countries like Vietnam, the Philippines, Bangladesh, Mexico and others.

Wages: Salaries are increasing in many countries, which also makes the process more expensive and difficult. Higher wages may also come with a higher likelihood of labor disputes, strikes and work stoppages. For example, port unions on the West Coast of the United States are currently negotiating a new labor contract.

Prices paid by wholesalers have increased

A tight labor market pushed wages up

Ability to pass on costs: Companies in different sectors will have different opportunities to pass costs on to their customers, and this will depend in part on their competitive environment. Companies with strong competition and tight margins are much less likely to change their supply chains unless absolutely essential.

Unrelated but simultaneous considerations: Central banks withdraw their accommodative measures, which has repercussions on currencies. The Japanese yen had crashed to a 20-year low against the US dollar amid diverging monetary policies between the two countries – the Federal Reserve has raised rates by 75 basis points in two moves since March, while the Bank of Japan eases its monetary policy. Politics. The People’s Bank of China is also easing, with the yuan falling to its lowest level in a year against the greenback.

Yuan weakness reflects Chinese growth concerns

At the end of the line

From a strategic perspective, it remains to be seen whether we are entering a period of de-globalization and economic fragmentation. From a logistical point of view, the process of relocating operations is difficult, complex, takes years and is expensive, with a relatively high risk for the capital investment.

Some companies may find it difficult to pass on costs in industries with high competition and tight margins, while managing the effects of inflation and changing central bank policies.

Read more articles like this on OpenMarkets

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Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC) Platforms Market Size and Forecast https://www.ameritas.co.uk/massive-open-online-courses-mooc-platforms-market-size-and-forecast/ Wed, 25 May 2022 17:20:20 +0000 https://www.ameritas.co.uk/massive-open-online-courses-mooc-platforms-market-size-and-forecast/ New Jersey, United States – Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) Platform Market The 2022-2029 report has been prepared based on an in-depth market analysis with input from industry experts. The Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) Market study sheds light on the significant growth momentum that is expected to prevail during the assessment period 2022-2029. The […]]]>

New Jersey, United States – Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) Platform Market The 2022-2029 report has been prepared based on an in-depth market analysis with input from industry experts. The Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) Market study sheds light on the significant growth momentum that is expected to prevail during the assessment period 2022-2029. The study offers statistics on key segments in important geographies, along with detailed mapping of the global competitive landscape. Additionally, the market report tracks global Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) platform sales across 25+ high-growth markets, while analyzing the impact COVID-19 has had on the industry and the massive open online course (MOOC) platform industry. specifically.

Main Drivers and Obstacles:

The high-impacting factors and renderers have been studied in the Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC) Platforms market report to help readers understand the overall development. Additionally, the report includes constraints and challenges that can be stumbling blocks in the players’ path. This will help users to be attentive and make informed decisions related to business. Specialists also focused on future business prospects.

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LinkedIn Learning, Pluralsight, Coursera, Udemy, Udacity, Alison, EDX, Xuetangx, Edmodo, WizIQ, Simplilearn, Federica EU, Skillshare, Futurelearn, NovoEd, Iversity, Intellipaat, Edureka, Linkstreet Learning, Jigsaw Academy, Kadenze

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Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC) Platforms Market – Types of Outlook (Revenue, USD Million, 2017 – 2029)

• XMOOC platforms
• CMOOC platforms

Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) Platform Market – Application Outlook (Revenue, USD Million, 2017 – 2029)

• K-12 education
• College education
• Education of adults and the elderly
• Business

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ATTRIBUTES DETAILS
ESTIMATED YEAR 2022
YEAR OF REFERENCE 2021
FORECAST YEAR 2029
HISTORICAL YEAR 2020
UNITY Value (million USD/billion)
SECTORS COVERED Types, applications, end users, and more.
REPORT COVER Revenue Forecast, Business Ranking, Competitive Landscape, Growth Factors and Trends
BY REGION North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Latin America, Middle East and Africa
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➛ North America (United States, Canada and Mexico)
➛ Europe (Germany, France, United Kingdom, Russia and Italy)
➛ Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, Korea, India and Southeast Asia)
➛ South America (Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, etc.)
➛ Middle East and Africa (Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Egypt, Nigeria and South Africa)

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Human consequences of the fragmentation of the global economy https://www.ameritas.co.uk/human-consequences-of-the-fragmentation-of-the-global-economy/ Mon, 23 May 2022 17:08:45 +0000 https://www.ameritas.co.uk/human-consequences-of-the-fragmentation-of-the-global-economy/ The Community of Chief Economists of the World Economic Forum expects lower economic activity, higher inflation, lower real wages and greater food insecurity around the world in 2022, highlighting the consequences devastating human rights from the fragmentation of the global economy. Reversing previous expectations for recovery, the majority of respondents to the latest survey expect […]]]>

The Community of Chief Economists of the World Economic Forum expects lower economic activity, higher inflation, lower real wages and greater food insecurity around the world in 2022, highlighting the consequences devastating human rights from the fragmentation of the global economy.

Reversing previous expectations for recovery, the majority of respondents to the latest survey expect only a subdued economic outlook in the United States, China, Latin America, South Asia and the Pacific, East Asia East, Sub-Saharan Africa and the Middle East and North Africa in 2022. In Europe, the majority expects the economic outlook to be weak.

The choices of businesses and governments are expected to result in further fragmentation of the global economy and unprecedented shifts in supply chains, creating a perfect storm of volatility and uncertainty. These models are expected to create further difficult trade-offs and choices for policy makers and, without greater coordination, shocking human costs. These are the main findings of the quarterly outlook from the World Economic Forum’s Chief Economists, released today.

“We are on the cusp of a vicious cycle that could impact societies for years. The pandemic and the war in Ukraine have fragmented the global economy and created profound consequences that threaten to undo the gains of the past 30 years. Leaders face tough choices and trade-offs domestically on debt, inflation and investment. Yet business and government leaders must also recognize the absolute necessity of global cooperation to prevent economic misery and hunger for millions around the world. This week’s annual meeting of the World Economic Forum will provide a starting point for such collaboration,” said Saadia Zahidi, Managing Director of the World Economic Forum.

Rising inflation, falling real wages and food insecurity

The war in Ukraine, continued outbreaks of COVID-19 variants and associated supply shocks are impacting inflation expectations. The majority of chief economists polled by the Forum expect high or very high inflation in 2022 in all markets except China and East Asia – 96% expecting high or very high inflation in 2022 high or very high inflation in the United States, 92% for Europe and 86% for Latin America. Meanwhile, two-thirds of chief economists expect average real wages to fall in the near term in advanced economies, while a third are uncertain. Ninety percent of respondents expect average real wages to fall in low-income economies.

With wheat prices expected to rise by more than 40% this year and vegetable oil, grain and meat prices reaching historic highs, the war in Ukraine is exacerbating world hunger and the cost crisis of life. Over the next three years, chief economists expect food insecurity to be worst in sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East and North Africa. At the current trajectory, the world is on track for the worst food crisis in recent history, compounded by the added pressure of high energy prices.

These expert predictions are echoed in the experience of the general public. A recent survey in 11 countries, conducted by Ipsos with the World Economic Forum, reveals high levels of public economic pessimism in the face of a cost of living crisis. Twenty-five percent of the public say they find it somewhat or very difficult to manage financially, ranging from two-thirds of Turkish citizens to 16% of American and German citizens. The largest group (34%) say they are “on the verge of getting through this”. Only 11% say they live comfortably while three in ten (29%) think they are doing well.

Expectations of price increases are also widespread across the 11 countries – almost four in five people expect the cost of their food purchases to rise, while three-quarters expect utility bills to rise utilities such as gas and electricity. For most countries, a rise in food prices is the area which households believe would have the greatest impact on their quality of life – this is the case for the United States, Canada, Italy, Japan, Australia, Poland and Turkey. In the other four countries (Britain, Italy, Germany and Spain), an increase in utility bills would have the greatest effect.

A difficult balancing act for policy makers

Faced with the challenge of containing inflation without tipping economies into recession, chief economists are divided. While a majority (57%) agree that the risks associated with higher inflation in low-income economies outweigh those associated with a short-term contraction due to monetary tightening, views on the effects in countries high income are more shared.

While fiscal spending is expected to increase in many countries to cope with current developments, balancing the risks of a cost-of-living crisis with higher debt is a major challenge for policymakers. In advanced economies, 54% of chief economists expect energy price subsidies, while 41% expect food price subsidies. In low-income economies, the vast majority think food price subsidies will be needed (86%), while 62% expect energy price subsidies. However, this need will have to be weighed against a higher risk of default (81% see this as an increased risk for developing economies).

With the World Bank expecting energy prices to rise more than 50% in 2022, before falling in 2023-24, policymakers must balance energy insecurity risks with transition towards greener energy. Most chief economists surveyed expect policymakers to try to tackle both challenges simultaneously. However, a clear majority of respondents expect the priority of energy security to be based on carbon-intensive sources rather than greener sources in all regions except Europe. and China.

Fragmentation and politicization of supply chains

As supply chains enter their third year of disruption, governments and businesses are rethinking their approach to exposure, self-sufficiency and security in their supply chains. The chief economists consider it likely or very likely that multinational companies will both localize and diversify their supply chains over the next three years, realigning them along geopolitical fault lines.

The November 2021 edition of Perspectives from the Chief Economists identified “de-globalization” as an emerging trend driven by the impact of the pandemic. The war in Ukraine and its geopolitical and economic fallout are accelerating these trends, with declining physical integration and growing friction in virtual space. A majority of chief economists surveyed for the month of May Outlook expect greater fragmentation in goods, technology and labor markets over the next three years, while most expect services to remain stable or become more globalized.

Four futures for economic globalization

A supplementary report from the World Economic Forum, released today, charts possible trajectories of globalization in the next five years. Four futures for economic globalization: scenarios and their implications describes how the nature of globalization can change as economic powers choose between fragmentation or integration into the physical and virtual dimensions of the global economy. The four scenarios are:

Globalization 5.0: Reconnection describes physical and virtual integration – a new form of globalization that combines integration with stronger national safety nets and alignment with global tax and technology frameworks.

Analog networks: virtual nationalism describes physical integration and virtual fragmentation – a potential future in which trade, especially of strategic commodities, is secure, but a technological race, cybersecurity issues and uncoordinated regulation lead to virtual disintegration.

Digital Dominance: Agile Platforms describes physical fragmentation and virtual integration, as the physical movement of goods and people declines and large global platforms dominate global economic activity.

Autarkic world: systemic fragmentation depicts both physical and virtual fragmentation compared to today, as leaders turn inward and seek greater control over production, services, people and technology.

The report calls for “no regrets actions” from policy makers such as: global cooperation on the climate crisis; investing in human capital to prepare people for a range of economic futures; and build resilience through greater economic integration, knowledge sharing and diversification.

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What future for Northern Ireland as the political crisis deepens? https://www.ameritas.co.uk/what-future-for-northern-ireland-as-the-political-crisis-deepens/ Tue, 17 May 2022 18:23:49 +0000 https://www.ameritas.co.uk/what-future-for-northern-ireland-as-the-political-crisis-deepens/ What future for Northern Ireland as the political crisis deepens? Jeffrey Donaldson, leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) of Northern Ireland, House of Commons, London, May 17, 2022. (AFP) Election results are supposed to tell us about the will of the people. Well, they used to, but not anymore. Today, we are left with […]]]>

What future for Northern Ireland as the political crisis deepens?

Jeffrey Donaldson, leader of the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) of Northern Ireland, House of Commons, London, May 17, 2022. (AFP)

Election results are supposed to tell us about the will of the people. Well, they used to, but not anymore. Today, we are left with a trail of clues wide open to interpretation at best, mainly because the results are becoming increasingly indecisive, reflecting a socio-political fragmentation that has gripped our societies, fueled by large partly by social media and poor leadership.
Of the various, mostly municipal, elections held in the UK this month, that for the Northern Ireland Assembly was probably the most intriguing. The emergence of Sinn Fein, the former political wing of the Irish Republican Army, as the biggest party in this British-controlled province – and with it the prospect of its vice-president Michelle O’Neill becoming prime minister – creates shock waves on both sides. from the Irish border, and in London too.
There is also a danger in over-interpreting the Northern Ireland results, as neither side won decisively. But with the municipal elections in Scotland, which were dominated by the Scottish National Party, there was a strong message of a wish to be freed from the domination of Westminster. Overall, these election results have also highlighted the question of whether people of different identities, whether from religion, ethnicity or history, and especially minorities, can be assured that they will not be forced to lose their identity, to be marginalized or, worse, to suffer discrimination. by the majority.
In the past, the answer was mainly division along religious or ethnic lines. The year it gained independence from the British, India was divided by partition between India and Pakistan along religious fault lines. Cyprus has remained divided since 1974 between its Greek and Turkish sectors. Yugoslavia disintegrated into several different countries. And in the case of Israel and Palestine, neither a one-state nor a two-state solution seems feasible in the foreseeable future.
All of these cases are dominated by identity politics, while two of the most notable experiences of political entities built on the basis of shared values ​​instead of ethnic, religious or class origins – the United States and the EU – are currently under strong domestic pressures due to such social divisions.
Returning to Northern Ireland, it is something of an anomaly, with an asymmetry between the strong desire of its Protestant Unionists to remain within the UK framework and the marked disinterest of the rest of the UK in whether or not he could join the Republic of Ireland. Northern Ireland is caught in a triangle between its difficult relationship with the UK and the Republic of Ireland and its own bigotry, a situation which has been further complicated by Brexit and its subsequent protocol on Northern Ireland. .
Demographic changes in this socio-political cauldron play a major role in how the winds blow over the future of Northern Ireland. More than a century after the partition of Ireland, Protestants have seen their majority in the north shrink from a two-to-one advantage in 1921 to less than 50% of the population. In a society whose main reason for belonging to the UK is the existence of a Protestant majority which considers itself British, this argument is rapidly losing credibility.
Additionally, in the Brexit referendum, Northern Ireland voted to remain in the EU by a substantial majority, which had a direct and acute impact on the future of the 1998 Good Friday Agreement. If the Good Friday Agreement succeeded in creating a kind of two-state solution in a one-state reality, where there is complete freedom of movement across the border between the north and the Republic in the south – when the two are EU members helped disguise that this was more of an Irish rather than a European arrangement – that claim has gone. Placing the border in the Irish Sea, and thereby calling into question Northern Ireland’s place within the United Kingdom, is Unionists’ worst nightmare and gives nationalists hope and their dream of a future united Ireland.
Sinn Fein’s success at the polls could count for very little if the main unionist party, the Democratic Unionist Party, continues to refuse to take part in any new power-sharing administration in Stormont until the Northern Ireland Protocol be modified, as indicated. by its leader Sir Jeffrey Donaldson, reiterating his campaign promise. Under power-sharing rules, an executive can only be formed if the DUP appoints a deputy prime minister and other ministers, as per the Good Friday Agreement.
The DUP’s approach distorts both the original intent of the power-sharing mechanism, which seeks to give voice to both sides of the sectarian divide, and the will of voters as expressed in this month’s elections. this. However well-meaning those who designed the machinery of government in Northern Ireland to be respectful of all sectors of society, it is operated by a hardline minority, who are holding the country hostage and depriving it of of a functional government body to try to force the UK government to breach an international agreement that only came into force last year. Again, partisanship is willing to risk what is a peaceful but fragile coexistence; one that was achieved through blood, sweat and many tears.

Partisanship is ready to risk what is a peaceful but fragile coexistence; one that was achieved through blood, sweat and many tears.

Yossi Mekelberg

Is it true that a system of government based on power sharing should not remain in place indefinitely, because it will eventually become a tool to prosecute the conflict by other means? Stormont’s administration had previously been suspended for three years, and his suspension became leverage to extort political concessions, mocking the arrangement.
Northern Ireland has been an experiment in an (almost) one-state solution since the Good Friday Agreement, which has brought relative calm to the province. However, the establishment of a hybrid political system has given a veto to those who are not fully invested in healing the society from decades of bloody conflict, preventing it from becoming a society with a common goal. and deprived it for long periods of time of being governed in accordance with the will of the electorate.
More importantly, the system has so far failed to develop a Northern Irish identity that is inclusive of all its people, while celebrating the diversity of a heterogeneous society – a failure that leads to a paralysis of governance and prolongs the life of sectarianism and its threat to peace.

  • Yossi Mekelberg is Professor of International Relations and Associate Fellow of the MENA Program at Chatham House. He regularly collaborates with the international written and electronic media. Twitter: @YMekelberg

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed by the authors in this section are their own and do not necessarily reflect the views of Arab News

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Birds are pollinators, their forgotten acorns often become trees https://www.ameritas.co.uk/birds-are-pollinators-their-forgotten-acorns-often-become-trees/ Mon, 16 May 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://www.ameritas.co.uk/birds-are-pollinators-their-forgotten-acorns-often-become-trees/ According to Patrick Smiddle, co-author of The Birds of County Cork coming out next month. Smiddy, based in East Cork, is a former editor of the newspaper irish birds and is an Honorary Research Associate in the UCC Ornithology Group. He retired from the National Parks and Wildlife Service in 2008, but continues to work […]]]>

According to Patrick Smiddle, co-author of The Birds of County Cork coming out next month. Smiddy, based in East Cork, is a former editor of the newspaper irish birds and is an Honorary Research Associate in the UCC Ornithology Group. He retired from the National Parks and Wildlife Service in 2008, but continues to work in wildlife consultancy and has fifty years’ experience in Irish ornithology.

The aim of the book is to examine the status, distribution and migration patterns of birds in County Cork (not Ireland, although trends for many species are similar across the country) from first recordings dating from the work of Charles Smith in 1750, The ancient and present state of the county and city of Corkuntil 2018.

It is a topical book. On the one hand, significant conservation efforts are being made to restore lost species such as two species of eagles and the red kite. On the other hand, climate change is causing an unprecedented decline in many bird populations while allowing colonization by new breeding species.

Of interest to ornithology students, conservation agencies, planners, environmental consultants, farmers, industrialists and the growing number of citizen scientists, the publication, with photographs by Richard Mills, includes a systematic list of 427 species of birds on county list.

“Birds are considered by the government to be important aspects of biodiversity,” says Smiddy. “And there is hardly a county council left that does not have a diversity action plan. Birds and other wild animals and their habitats are protected by legislation at EU and EU level. A small number of species can be legally shot in “open season” and the current level of shooting is not a threat to biodiversity.”

Pat Smiddy photographed in 2000. Photo: Richard T. Mills

But problems arise “from unintended consequences of government policy and other actions.” Agriculture, for example, has reached a stage of intensification through government policy and scientific research. Due to intensification, a wide range of farmland birds have been affected and some have stopped breeding, such as corncrake, gray partridge and corn bunting, while others have declined, including yellowhammer, skylark and meadow pipit. This trend is not unique to Ireland; this happened all over Europe.

“More products can now be extracted from a given area of ​​land than at any time in the past. This is achieved through high inputs of fertilizers, insecticides and herbicides. Birds in hedgerows have been reduced by the removal of hedgerows to allow large machinery to operate. “On the other hand, corvids and gulls positively exploit exposed food after silage cutting and slurry spreading.”

Apart from the fact that people derive great pleasure from the wildlife around them, birds can also serve useful functions. “We often hear about insects being pollinators. Sometimes birds are also pollinators. The jay, for example, can plant a wood.

They pick up acorns and hide them and the ones they forget to rediscover can become trees.

Smiddy says the forest policy is to increase the area under trees, primarily but not exclusively, conifers. “If these plantings are placed on poor agricultural land in the uplands – and most have been – then they remove that habitat, but create new one. Open moorland bird species may decline.” This affects skylark, meadow pipit, willow ptarmigan and hen harrier. “But species such as the golden crest, great tit, siskin and red crossbill could increase.”

It is not a simple image. “It’s a mix of decreases and increases in populations, with a tendency more towards decrease than increase for the most part.”

The book is not intended to hold any sector to the test, “just to state the trend species by species, and hope that at least some of what we conclude could be taken into account by the authorities in the ‘policy making for the future’.

The Birds of County Cork
The Birds of County Cork

Global warming, says Smiddy, has been going on since the industrial revolution and is now known to be driven by human activities, in particular the increased use of fossil fuels. “Global warming has caused population shifts – as well as declines – in many species across Europe, the most obvious being a trend towards a northward shift in range for many. Indeed, the southern regions are becoming less suitable than before while the northern regions are becoming more suitable.”

With the need to reduce dependence on fossil fuels involving the production of energy from onshore and offshore wind as well as solar radiation, this may lead to a reduction in some species. “Most onshore wind turbines are placed on the highlands, which are an important habitat for several bird species. The construction of wind turbines results in the fragmentation of large swaths of upland areas. -Martin and black grouse.”

While Smiddy says he’s not an expert on climate change, he thinks it can’t be reversed, “certainly not in the short term.” Most people alive today will not see a significant change for the better. think we have to lose a lot more before we take the necessary action. Climate change is going to have a huge impact on everyone. Really bad pain has to hit people before there are any significant changes.

And he adds that even if Ireland does all it can to reverse climate change over the next fifty years, “it will make little difference unless the effort spans continents and the planet”.

  • The Birds of County Cork by Patrick Smiddy, Mark Shorten & Russ Heselden will be published by Cork University Press in June for €39. corkuniversitypress.com
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Gardening: David Domoney shares tips for attracting hedgehogs to the garden https://www.ameritas.co.uk/gardening-david-domoney-shares-tips-for-attracting-hedgehogs-to-the-garden/ Sat, 14 May 2022 03:01:00 +0000 https://www.ameritas.co.uk/gardening-david-domoney-shares-tips-for-attracting-hedgehogs-to-the-garden/ Unfortunately, the hedgehog population in the UK is declining at a worrying rate. Wildlife charities People’s Trust for Endangered Species (PTES) and The British Hedgehog Preservation Society (BHPS) recently published a report which found that hedgehog populations have fallen by 30-75% in rural areas since 2000, with the biggest falls in the east of England. […]]]>

Unfortunately, the hedgehog population in the UK is declining at a worrying rate. Wildlife charities People’s Trust for Endangered Species (PTES) and The British Hedgehog Preservation Society (BHPS) recently published a report which found that hedgehog populations have fallen by 30-75% in rural areas since 2000, with the biggest falls in the east of England. . What can gardeners in the UK do to make their gardens better habitats for hedgehogs, hoping their populations don’t decline further?

According to David Domoney, “hedgehogs are a gardener’s best friend”.

He said: “In fact, I consider them one of the best garden bouncers, keeping out unwanted garden visitors like slugs and snails.”

David often shares his best gardening tips and tricks on his website, and he recently wrote about what gardeners can do to create better habitats for hedgehogs.

Not surprisingly, a pile of logs is the perfect place for hedgehogs to hibernate, keeping them warm and safe from predators.

READ MORE: Gardening: Monty Don shares ‘best way’ to dead tulips

David advised: “Start by collecting some wood and choose a quiet, undisturbed section of your garden to set it up.

“Piles of logs or piles of dead leaves are great for shelter, but they’re also an excellent food source, as many insects will also find attractive places to hide.”

It is worth leaving part of the garden wild and untamed to attract not only hedgehogs, but also other wild animals.

Creating a “hedgehog highway” is another way to invite spiky creatures into the garden.

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To do this, David recommended “cutting a 13 x 13 cm (5.1 x 5.1 inch) hole in the bottom of your fence and encouraging your neighbors to do the same will allow the hedgehogs to roam freely. between the gardens as a larger network”.

This saves hedgehogs from having to travel on roads, which have repeatedly proven perilous for mammals.

Grace Johnson, Hedgehog Officer for the Hedgehog Street campaign, agreed hedgehog highways were a good idea.

She said: “Habitat fragmentation and a lack of suitable habitat are two issues facing British hedgehogs.

“Creating a small 13cm x 13cm square hedgehog hole – or hedgehog highway – in a garden fence is a great way to help, as it will allow hedgehogs to move between neighboring gardens in search of food, shelter and companions.

“Gardens can be a refuge for hedgehogs, but only if they are accessible.”

Hedgehog Street activists have also shared that leaving piles of logs in the garden is a good way to attract hedgehogs.

Compost piles can also make an attractive nesting site for critters, the campaign’s website says.

Outdoor composting is great for attracting insects, which in turn will attract hedgehogs as they prey on the scary critters.

Additionally, leaf piles, similar to log piles, can be used as a potential nesting site for hedgehogs, as well as bedding material for any other nesting sites or hedgehog boxes in the vicinity.

Ponds are “underrated as a hedgehog-friendly feature,” according to Hedgehog Street.

Campaigners said: “Hedgehogs will benefit from a year-round water supply, and they will thrive on the extra insects it attracts.

“Hedgehogs are great swimmers, just make sure there’s a gently sloping edge for them to escape – you can use rocks or wire mesh – to make sure they don’t drown not.”

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Global Fresh Produce Industry Coalition calls for declaring F&V as a strategic good in the current supply chain and cost crisis https://www.ameritas.co.uk/global-fresh-produce-industry-coalition-calls-for-declaring-fv-as-a-strategic-good-in-the-current-supply-chain-and-cost-crisis/ Wed, 11 May 2022 12:48:30 +0000 https://www.ameritas.co.uk/global-fresh-produce-industry-coalition-calls-for-declaring-fv-as-a-strategic-good-in-the-current-supply-chain-and-cost-crisis/ The global fresh produce industries are uniting to call on national and regional public authorities and multilateral bodies, such as the WTO, FAO, UNCTAD, OECD and others, to respond urgently to the significant increases current costs of logistics, inputs such as fertilizers, packaging materials and energy, and a general labor shortage that jeopardizes the economic […]]]>

The global fresh produce industries are uniting to call on national and regional public authorities and multilateral bodies, such as the WTO, FAO, UNCTAD, OECD and others, to respond urgently to the significant increases current costs of logistics, inputs such as fertilizers, packaging materials and energy, and a general labor shortage that jeopardizes the economic viability of the fresh produce industry in the global scale.

With a total production of 1.6 billion T (2019)[1], the sector estimates that approximately 50% of fresh produce is consumed locally and 50% is intended for trade. The global fruit and vegetable trade stood at a market value of USD 220 billion in 2020.[2] With more than 200 origins and 200 destinations, the global agricultural products industry is a sector that operates with high fragmentation, the mix of small, medium and large producers and a complex national and global supply chain, to maintain the food safety and product quality.

While the sector has demonstrated its resilience over the past two years of the COVID pandemic, current global supply chain challenges have resulted in cascading negative effects for all parts of the industry. The sector has seen cost increases in several areas including: 150-400% in container prices, 20% in trucking up to 80% in air freight, up to 100% in, up to 100% in the cost of fertilizers and up to 100% in the price of wooden pallets. At the regional level, the economic burden of maritime logistics can be summarized as follows:

  • Southern Hemisphere producers estimate a $3.8 billion cost increase from container prices increasing by about 150% for 2022.
  • European producers and traders estimate a total cost increase of €10 billion for 2022 cumulated by all challenges along the supply chain plus €4 billion for additional logistics costs (domestic, intra-EU, export, import )
  • North American fresh produce industry reports container prices soared to $25,000, a massive increase from pre-pandemic costs of around $3,000
  • Over 86% of ColeACP members are concerned that their economic viability will be impacted by the current logistical disruptions and over 70% are considering implementing business changes

In view of the above, the Global Fresh Produce Coalition urges key stakeholders and public authorities to undertake urgent solutions to stabilize the sector in times of crisis. To this end, we have identified potential mechanisms to safeguard the short-term economic viability and sustainability of the sector, including the following concrete proposals:

  • Increase attention and recognition of fruits and vegetables as a “strategic good” that contributes significantly to the long-term sustainability of the planet and to public health policies.
  • Create stabilization mechanisms to improve the accessibility of fresh produce, to ensure that fruits and vegetables can continue to be available to all.
  • Balancing the distorted ocean freight environment that has seen significant change, with carriers setting record rates and profits through the vertical integration of major shipping lines that have tightened their control of existing supply chains.
  • Introduce transport subsidies for fruit and vegetable producers and exporters aimed at mitigating the immediate impact of inflated price distortions in the sea freight market.
  • Promote a global zero VAT strategy for fruit and vegetables that would directly benefit producers, exporters and consumers.

“Facilitate better access to major export markets through various mechanisms that do not lead to unfair market distortions, including the reduction of import duties and quotas, among others”

  • Avoid aggressive promotional price discounts made available to end consumers that undermine the value of fresh produce and ultimately reduce already stretched margins for growers and exporters.
  • Strengthen public promotional investments aimed at increasing recognition and, ultimately, consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables during the southern hemisphere off-season.

The Global Fresh Produce Coalition is committed to continuing its work on sector-specific solutions – both together and within its respective regional contexts. However, these complex issues with dramatic consequences can only be addressed through public-private collaboration, in which we aim to be a constructive and proactive partner.


[1] FAOSTAT – World production

[2] TRADEMAP – Global Exports

The “Global Fresh Produce Coalition” is a united approach of international fruit and vegetable associations led by their vision to work together for resilient global fruit and vegetable value chains that enable economic, environmental and societal benefits”. The coalition’s mission is to articulate solutions to disruptions in the global supply chain for the production and trade of fresh produce (increasing costs), which have raised significant concerns about the sector’s business model and its ability to provide cost-effective fresh fruits and vegetables to support the diet. safety and health.

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As Britain turned away from the EU, Northern Ireland turned to Sinn Fein https://www.ameritas.co.uk/as-britain-turned-away-from-the-eu-northern-ireland-turned-to-sinn-fein/ Sun, 08 May 2022 06:23:04 +0000 https://www.ameritas.co.uk/as-britain-turned-away-from-the-eu-northern-ireland-turned-to-sinn-fein/ With nearly all the votes counted on Saturday, Sinn Fein, Ireland’s main nationalist party, declared victory, racking up 27 of the 90 available seats in the Northern Ireland Assembly, the most of any party in the territory. The Democratic Unionist Party, which represents those who want Northern Ireland to remain part of the UK, slipped […]]]>

With nearly all the votes counted on Saturday, Sinn Fein, Ireland’s main nationalist party, declared victory, racking up 27 of the 90 available seats in the Northern Ireland Assembly, the most of any party in the territory. The Democratic Unionist Party, which represents those who want Northern Ireland to remain part of the UK, slipped to second place, with 24 seats.

“Today ushers in a new era which I believe offers us all the opportunity to reinvent relationships in this society on the basis of fairness, on the basis of equality and on the basis of social justice. “said Michelle O’Neill, the leader of the party who is set to become the region’s premier.

Although Brexit was not on the ballot, it cast a shadow over the campaign, particularly for the DUP, the flagship unionist party that has led the power-sharing government in Northern Ireland. since its inception by the Good Friday Peace Agreement, almost a quarter of a century ago.

The legacy of Brexit has rippled through local elections across the British Isles: in London, where anti-Brexit voters ceded Conservative Party strongholds to Labour, and in the ‘Red Wall’ areas of the pro-Brexit rust belt in England, where the Tories have resisted. Work. But in Northern Ireland, the effect of Brexit was decisive.

For all the history of Sinn Fein’s victory – the first for a party that calls for a united Ireland and has residual links to the Irish Republican Army – the election results are less of a breakthrough for Irish nationalism than a marker of the demoralization of Unionist voters. , the disarray of their leaders and an electorate that gives more importance to economic issues than to sectarian struggles.

Much of this can be attributed to Brexit.

“Accepting the loss of supremacy is a daunting task for trade unionism,” said Diarmaid Ferriter, professor of modern Irish history at University College Dublin. “But the trade unionists really managed to shoot themselves in the foot.”

The DUP has struggled to rally voters divided and angry over the changed status of the North – it is the only UK member that shares a border with the EU member Republic of Ireland.

This hybrid status has complicated life in many ways, including requiring a complex trade agreement, the Northern Ireland Protocol, which imposes border controls on goods entering Northern Ireland from mainland Britain. Many trade unionists complain that it has driven a wedge between them and the rest of the UK by effectively creating a border in the Irish Sea.

The DUP endorsed the protocol, only to later backfire and walk away from the last Northern Ireland government in protest. Unionist voters punished him for the shift, with some voting for a tougher Unionist party and others turning to a centrist, non-sectarian party, the Alliance, which also recorded significant gains.

The Alliance’s success, political analysts say, suggests Northern Ireland could move past the sectarian furies of the past and a binary divide between unionists and nationalists.

Even Sinn Fein, which for decades has been associated with the bloody struggle for Irish unity, said little about the subject during the campaign, keeping the focus on core issues such as jobs, the cost of living and the overburdened health system. .

As the 25th anniversary of the Good Friday Agreement approaches, some analysts have said it is time to review the North’s political structure.

The agreement ended decades of sectarian strife by, among other things, creating an open border on the island. But he also balanced political power between Nationalists and Unionists, at a time when predominantly Protestant Unionists were in the majority and predominantly Catholic Nationalists were a restive minority.

Demographic trends have changed that: the faster-growing Catholic population is poised to overtake Protestants. Although the link between religion and political identification is not automatic – there are Catholics who prefer to stay in the UK – trends favored nationalists even before Brexit.

As the largest party, Sinn Fein will have the right to appoint a prime minister, the symbolic senior government official. But the final seat tally between nationalists and trade unionists is likely to be tight, as the other two unionist parties won a handful of seats, and the only other party that calls itself nationalist, the Social Democratic and Labor Party, won. obtained poor results.

As runners-up, the DUP has the right to nominate a deputy prime minister, who functions as a de facto equal. However, he did not commit to participating in a government with a Sinn Fein prime minister. And he has threatened to boycott until the protocol is dropped, a position that garners little support beyond his hard core.

“There is fragmentation within parties trying to reflect a more secular Northern Ireland,” said Katy Hayward, a politics professor at Queen’s University Belfast. “This sits uneasily with the architects of the peace accord. There is no longer a dominant group. We are all minorities.

In this more complex landscape, Hayward said, Sinn Fein was likely to govern as much as it campaigned, focusing on competent management and sound policies rather than mobilizing an urgent campaign for Irish unity.

O’Neill, the leader of Sinn Fein in Northern Ireland, hailed what she called “the election of a generation”. But she said little about Irish unity. Sinn Fein chief executive Mary Lou McDonald said last week she could foresee an Irish unification referendum within a decade, and possibly “within five years”.

For trade unionists, the path out of the desert is more difficult to trace. Hayward said the DUP faced a tough choice over whether to participate in the next government.

If he refuses, he would violate the spirit of the Good Friday Agreement. It would also risk further alienating voters, especially “soft unionists,” who have little patience for continued paralysis in government.

But if he joins the next government, it carries its own perils. The DUP swung to the right during the campaign to fend off a challenge from the more radical party of the traditional unionist voice. She made her opposition to the Northern Ireland protocol an article of faith.

“There may be serious talk now about unionist unity, but there will be no government unless the protocol is passed,” said David Campbell, chairman of the Loyalist Communities Council, which represents a group of pro-union paramilitary groups that vehemently oppose the protocol.

This puts the future of the DUP out of its hands, since the decision to revise the protocol rests with the UK government. Prime Minister Boris Johnson has indicated he is ready to do so – especially if it would facilitate a new Northern Ireland government – ​​but he must weigh other considerations.

Canceling the protocol would increase tensions with the EU and even risk sparking a trade war, a grim prospect at a time when Britain is already facing runaway inflation and warnings that its economy could crash. recession later this year.

It would also upset the United States, which has warned Johnson not to do anything that jeopardizes the Good Friday Agreement.

“The Biden administration has made it clear that the protocol does not pose a threat to the Good Friday Agreement,” said Bobby McDonagh, Ireland’s former ambassador to Britain. “It actually helps support the Good Friday deal. It will act as a sort of constraint on Johnson.

© 2022 The New York Times Company

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The reproductive sector – Fertile ground for PE offers | Latham & Watkins LLP https://www.ameritas.co.uk/the-reproductive-sector-fertile-ground-for-pe-offers-latham-watkins-llp/ Wed, 04 May 2022 18:26:13 +0000 https://www.ameritas.co.uk/the-reproductive-sector-fertile-ground-for-pe-offers-latham-watkins-llp/ The fertility sector is likely to present growing opportunities for PE as an emerging multi-faceted industry. The global fertility industry, which has grown significantly in recent years as demand continues to soar, is expected to be valued at over US$30 billion by 2023, up from around US$16 billion in 2016. While the global market is […]]]>

The fertility sector is likely to present growing opportunities for PE as an emerging multi-faceted industry.

The global fertility industry, which has grown significantly in recent years as demand continues to soar, is expected to be valued at over US$30 billion by 2023, up from around US$16 billion in 2016. While the global market is growing, fragmented European markets, fertility regulatory regimes and complex US regulations require specialized legal advice to successfully complete transactions. The recent transactions highlight the breadth and international reach of the investment opportunities that exist, from clinical-focused companies to those specializing in the development of medical devices.

Why the bump?

According to the United Nations, global fertility rates have fallen sharply since 1960, driving demand for fertility services and medical treatment. Social factors also contributed; many expectant parents decide to delay childbearing until later in life, while same-sex couples turn to certain fertility services. Governments are taking note – for example, France recently extended public funding for fertility services to lesbian and single women, as well as funding for fertility preservation for personal reasons. Employers are also paying attention and offering fertility benefits as a way to attract and retain talent, which will likely further drive the growing demand.

European regulatory fragmentation

In Europe, the fertility industry has disparate regulatory regimes applicable depending on the exact nature of the products or services offered, with each jurisdiction applying its own laws. Detailed regulatory due diligence is advised – extending to any ethical restrictions and licensing requirements that may apply in each territory, in addition to compliance with national laws and regulations.

While the current barriers to entry may be attractive to sponsors able to navigate this web of rules and regulations, greater convergence of EU rules applicable to fertility clinics and related industries (such as donors and genetic testing) could be on the horizon. The EU Human Tissues and Cells Directive is being revised, which could remove some of the barriers of working under multiple EU regulatory regimes and pave the way for new investment opportunities.

Business health checks

Negotiators should note that other key issues often go beyond those associated with similar deals outside the fertility sector – ownership of companies may be restricted requiring careful structuring, individual premises may require a license, and issues of data protection and genetic privacy need to be addressed.

For example, the United States has an established regulatory framework for the fertility treatment sector and adjacent industries, the nature of the regulation again depending on the type of products and/or services offered. The Food and Drug Administration regulates the manufacture or sale of biological products, including human tissue, and fertility-related medical devices, while US health care regulatory laws govern the provision of health services, including including fertility clinics, and any financial arrangements between such providers and product manufacturers. . Clinics and professional medical service providers in the United States are also subject to state oversight, which requires careful regulatory scrutiny. Additionally, data privacy is regulated on both a federal and state-by-state basis, creating a complex compliance regime.

Rewarding offers

As demand for fertility services increases on both sides of the Atlantic, we believe the EP will play an important role in funding the next stage of growth in this rewarding sector.

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